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Adverbial clauses (1)

5. Lernjahr 45 Minuten
  • Aufgabe 1

    5 Minuten 8 Punkte
    einfach

    Grammar

    Mark the adverbial clause in each sentence.

    1. We waited for bus as long as we could.
    2. Did you call Uncle Jim after work?
    3. He has to go to school by train until he passes his driving exam.
    4. Wherever the team plays, you see hundreds of the team’s fans.
    5. Because I hadn’t studied, I didn’t get a good mark on my Spanish test.
    6. They followed the film crew around the city centre in order to see their favourite actor.
    7. She ate so much that she needed to lie down.
    8. It only rained a little although the weather forecast said it would rain all day.
  • Aufgabe 2

    5 Minuten 13 Punkte
    mittel

    Grammar

    Complete the table. Put the subordinating conjunctions into the correct categories. Each category should have at least two conjunctions.

    after / although / anywhere / because / even though / in order that / since / since / so that / until / where / while / while

    time place reason contrast purpose
             
             
             
             
  • Aufgabe 3

    10 Minuten 15 Punkte
    mittel

    Grammar

    Use one of the subordinating conjunctions from the box to rewrite each sentence or pair of sentences with an adverbial clause.

    even though / everywhere / since / so that / whenever
    1. I walk past my neighbour’s house and their dog always starts barking.
    2. Karin can’t participate in the karate club. The volleyball team and the karate club meet on Wednesdays, and Karin is on the volleyball team.
    3. She doesn’t like coffee, but she ordered a milky coffee.
    4. We go to the cinema early. As a result, we get good seats.
    5. Look around. You can see Christmas decorations in all the shop windows.
  • Aufgabe 4

    25 Minuten 12 Punkte
    schwer

    Reading

    Read the extract from the short story and answer each question with a complete sentence. Each sentence should have an adverbial clause.

    For example: When will the Canterville Ghost be satisfied? The Canterville Ghost will be satisfied when he scares the Otis family. or: When he scares the Otis family, the Canterville Ghost will be satisfied.

    The ghost is trying everything he knows to scare the Otis family, the new family living in the house. So far, he hasn’t been successful. “[The ghost] had not appeared in [this costume] for more than seventy years; in fact, not since he had so frightened pretty Lady Barbara Modish by means of it, that she suddenly broke off her engagement with the present Lord Canterville’s grandfather, and ran away to [another town] with handsome Jack Castleton, declaring that nothing in the world would [convince] her to marry into a family that allowed such a horrible phantom to walk up and down the terrace at twilight.  Poor Jack was afterwards shot in a duel by Lord Canterville …, and Lady Barbara died of a broken heart … before the year was out, so, in every way, it had been a great success.  It was, however, an extremely difficult ‘make-up,’ … and it took him fully three hours to make his preparations.  At last everything was ready, and he was very pleased with his appearance.  The big leather riding-boots that went with the [clothing] were just a little too large for him, and he could only find one of the two horse-pistols, but, on the whole, he was quite satisfied, and at a quarter past one he glided out of the [wall] and crept down the corridor.  On reaching the room occupied by the twins, … he found the door just [a bit open].  Wishing to make an effective entrance, he [pushed] it wide open, when a heavy jug of water fell right down on him, wetting him to the skin, and just missing his left shoulder by a couple of inches.  At the same moment he heard … laughter … from the four-post bed.  The shock to his nervous system was so great that he fled back to his room as hard as he could go, and the next day he was laid up [in bed] with a severe cold.  The only thing that at all consoled him in the whole affair was the fact that he had not brought his head with him, for, had he done so, the consequences might have been very serious.”

    (Adapted from Wilde, Oscar: “The Canterville Ghost” in Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime; The Portrait of Mr. W.H., and Other Stories Source: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/773/773-h/773-h.htm#page65)

    1. In the ghost’s opinion, why was frightening Lady Barbara a success?
    2. Why did the ghost wear a costume and put on make-up?
    3. What happened when the ghost opened the door?
    4. What did the ghost do as soon as the water fell on him?
    5. What happened the day after the water fell on him?
    6. Why was the ghost glad he hadn’t brought his head with him?